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Upcoming Events

Thu
26
Feb

Francesco Durante's Stabat Mater

7:30pm | Memorial Church, MAP
Free

The Department of Music presents a concert featuring the music of Francesco Durante (1684 -1755). Despite living in Naples, a city consumed by opera, this prolific composer devoted his life to sacred music. Featured in this lenten concert is his Stabat Mater. Previously thought to be incomplete and thus unperformable, the primary source is held in Stanford Green Library's Special Collection and has been prepared by students Daniel Gonzalez and Ethan Williams with Dr. Marie-Louise Catsalis as part of the course Editing and Performing Early Music. Voice students from this course, Alaina Brown, Danielle Smith and Shu Chen Ong  will perform the solo roles and join forces with the Philharmonia Baroque Chorale conducted by Bruce Lamott for this modern premiere, co-sponsored by Stanford Live. 

This program made possible with generous support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and The Drs. Ben and A. Jess Shenson Fund.

Fri
27
Feb

Stanford Symphony Orchestra and Stanford Symphonic Chorus

7:30pm | Bing Concert Hall, MAP

Stephen M. Sano conducts the Stanford Symphony Orchestra and Stanford Symphonic Chorus with featured soloists Nancy Wait-Kromm, soprano, and Kenneth Goodson, baritone.

Program

  • Brahms: Akademische Festouvertüre, Op. 80
  • Brahms: Ein deutsches Requiem, Op. 45
Fri
27
Feb

Clara McCreery: Senior Violin Recital

7:30pm | Campbell Recital Hall, MAP
Free

Clara McCreery's program will include selections by Bach, Corigliano, Elgar, and Sarasate.

Sat
28
Feb

Stanford Symphony Orchestra and Stanford Symphonic Chorus

7:30pm | Bing Concert Hall, MAP

Stephen M. Sano conducts the Stanford Symphony Orchestra and Stanford Symphonic Chorus with featured soloists Nancy Wait-Kromm, soprano, and Kenneth Goodson, baritone.

Program

  • Brahms: Akademische Festouvertüre, Op. 80
  • Brahms: Ein deutsches Requiem, Op. 45
Sat
28
Feb

Lennart Jansson and Benjamon Salmon: Cello Recital

7:30pm | Campbell Recital Hall, MAP
Free

This program of music for cello witll include cello sonatas by Alkan, Poulenc, and Debussy.

Sun
01
Mar

Justin Cavazos, bass: Senior Voice Recital

7:00pm | Campbell Recital Hall, MAP
Free

Justin Cavazos performs works by Beethoven, Richard Strauss, Fauré, and others.

Mon
02
Mar

John Ahern: Harpsichord Recital

7:30pm | Memorial Church, MAP
Free

John Ahern performs on harpsichord with members of the Stanford Baroque Soloists: Elan Degenais, violin; Eren Billir, cello; Emily Graber, violin; Eun-Mee Jeong, violin; Alessandra Aquilanti, viola; George Anderson, viola; Lennart Jansson, cello; and Janice Gho, bass.

The program will include works from Peter Phillips, William Byrd, Jan Peterson Sweelinck, and J. S. Bach. 

Wed
04
Mar

NOON CONCERT: Flute Students of Greer Ellison

12:15pm | Campbell Recital Hall, MAP
Free

Flute students perform (program TBA).

Wed
04
Mar

Organ Students of Robert Huw Morgan

7:30pm | Memorial Church, MAP
Free

Organ students perform in Memorial Church.

Wed
04
Mar

David A. Jaffe: From "Silicon Valley Breakdown" to "The Space Between Us"

7:30pm | CCRMA Stage, MAP
Free

This colloquium and concert by David A. Jaffe highlights 30 years of spatial music with computers. In the mid-1950s, American composer Henry Brant wrote that “single-style music can no longer evoke the multi-directional assaults of contemporary life on the spirit.” In pursuit of a framework for music based on simultaneity, he made a series of experiments and compositions exploring the physical position of sounds as an essential compositional element. Jaffe met Brant in the mid-1970s, and became a life-long friend and advocate. In 1979, at CCRMA, he began applying the principles of acoustic spatial music to the computer domain. In this colloquium and concert, Jaffe discusses and presents three of his spatial works, spanning a 30-year period.  

Silicon Valley Breakdown for synthetic plucked strings (1982) will be heard in a newly-restored form, a rare opportunity to hear this well-known work in its original 4-channel format. Impossible Animals (1986) for live performers and computer-synthesized voices creates a hybrid human-bird vocalise, as if the brain of a bird were transplanted into the body of a wildly-gifted soprano.  Finally, The Space Between Us (2011), an acoustic spatial work with interactive computer control, uses 21 robotic mechanical instruments created by Trimpin, positioned around and above the audience. A video of this work will be presented, featuring CCRMA alumnus Andrew Schloss performing on a new version of the Boie / Mathews Radiodrum, accompanied by eight string players distributed throughout the hall.

David A. Jaffe (b. 1955) is a composer, performer, and computer music innovator. He attended Bennington College and Stanford University, where he received the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in 1983, and has taught at Princeton University, UC San Diego, Melbourne University, and Stanford. His large catalogue is noted for its personal "maximalist" approach in the American experimentalist tradition of Charles Ives and Henry Brant, as well as its ground-breaking use of technology in pieces such as Silicon Valley Breakdown, frequently cited as a a landmark of computer music. Also an expert programmer, he was hired by Steve Jobs in 1987 to collaborate with Julius O. Smith in creating music software for the NeXT Computer. He later co-founded Staccato Systems, Inc. and is currently Senior Scientist/Engineer at Universal Audio, Inc. Jaffe's music has been performed by the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, the Brooklyn Philharmonic, the Cabrillo Festival Orchestra, and numerous chamber ensembles, with commissions from the Kronos Quartet, the Russian National Orchestra, Cello Octet Amsterdam, Chanticleer, and others. His music has been featured on the San Francisco Symphony chamber music series and at festivals in 26 countries, including the Berlin Festival, the American Festival in London, and the Venice Biennale.

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