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Upcoming Events

Sat
18
Apr

Reactions to the Record: Player Piano Project Symposium

9:30am | Campbell Recital Hall, MAP
Free

The Player Piano Project is a collaborative effort of the Stanford Department of Music and the Archive of Recorded Sound with support from individuals and institutions around the globe. The symposium will offer an opportunity to experience rare player pianos and rolls in person and to learn how they are revising our understanding of performance history of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Speakers include Peter Phillips (Sydney Conservatorium), Kenneth Hamilton (Cardiff University), and Darius Kucinskas (Kaunas University of Technology).

The Reactions to the Record symposium is free with registration (does not include evening concert admission for Stanford Symphony Orchestra).

Sat
18
Apr

Music <541> Presents: Pablo Gómez Cano, guitar; Scott Worthington, double bass; and Dustin Donahue, percussion

5:30pm | Elliott Program Center, MAP

The installation Situation #1 (2014) by Music 541's Alexandra Hay is a prelude to the evening performance by Pablo Gómez Cano, guitar; Scott Worthington, double bass; and Dustin Donahue, percussion at CCRMA.

Sat
18
Apr

Music <541> Presents: Pablo Gómez Cano, guitar; Scott Worthington, double bass; and Dustin Donahue, percussion

7:30pm | CCRMA Stage, MAP
Free

Pablo Gómez Cano, guitar; Scott Worthington, double bass; and Dustin Donahue, percussion, perform new music by Stanford composers for trio with electronics.

Sat
18
Apr

Stanford Symphony Orchestra: Reactions to the Record

7:30pm | Bing Concert Hall, MAP

The Stanford Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Jindong Cai, performs Rachmaninoff's Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini with soloist Ben Mildenhall, piano, as well as the U.S. premiere of a new work by Julio D’Escrivan for pianola, orchestra, and iPhone, with Rex Lawson, pianola. Also featured will be Grieg's Piano Concerto in A Minor with soloist Percy Grainger preserved via a piano roll performance, and other great artists including Gershwin, Mahler, Stravinsky, and Rachmaninoff will also be heard "live" from historical piano rolls in collaboration with Reactions to the Record and the Player Piano Project.

Sun
19
Apr

Los Angeles Children's Chorus

2:30pm | Bing Concert Hall, MAP

This culturally diverse chorus, whose sound the Los Angeles Times called “hauntingly beautiful,” is one of America’s most refined and accomplished children’s groups. Founded in 1986 and led since 1996 by Artistic Director Anne Tomlinson, the chorus has performed with leading artists like Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic and Plácido Domingo at the Los Angeles Opera. Shaped by a long-term training program, these young singers have wowed audiences in North and South America, Africa, Europe, and China. 

Tue
21
Apr

Imagining the Universe: Andrei Linde - "Universe or Multiverse?"

6:00pm | Cubberley Auditorium, MAP
Free

Cosmological observations show that the universe is very uniform on the maximally large scale accessible to our telescopes. The best theoretical explanation of this uniformity is provided by the inflationary theory. Rather paradoxically, this theory also predicts that on a very large scale, much greater than what we can see now, the world may look totally different. Instead of being a single spherically symmetric balloon, our universe may look like a “multiverse”, a collection of many different exponentially large balloons (“universes”) with different laws of physics operating in each of them. The new cosmological paradigm, supported by recent developments in string theory, changes the standard views on the origin and the global structure of the universe and on our own place in the world.

Andrei Linde is a professor of physics at Stanford University, one of the authors of the inflationary theory and the theory of inflationary multiverse. He invented the theory of chaotic inflation, which is the most general form of inflationary cosmology. Linde also helped to develop the mechanism of vacuum stabilization in string theory, which allowed to incorporate the theory of inflationary multiverse in the context of string theory. He is the author of the books Inflation and Quantum Cosmology and Particle Physics and Inflationary Cosmology. His honors include the Dirac Medal, Peter Gruber Prize, the Fundamental Physics Prize, and Kavli Prize.

Thu
23
Apr

WaxyTomb [aka Julia Litman-Cleper]: Live electronics and video

7:30pm | CCRMA Stage, The Knoll, MAP

Waxy Tomb is the pet name of the original disequilibrium chamber, for temporal column production, which is used for the cooling process after transformational self-columns have been thoroughly collapsed and dis-localized by ocular-temporal shifts in phase space. This is necessary for the identification of the sutures and seam-lines between modified supra-objects. These sutures are exemplified in their local state as space between skin and skeleton, building and infrastructure. But they can also be localized by temporal states: layered embalming allows a shifted object to also contain its own system formation manipulation. To make the sutures re-identifiable and enclose them in a material, they must be dislocated from their state or process between. Their re-enclosure involves a repeated re-enactment of their original surface tension patterns and finally nodal-substrate recollection. This results in a diffusely situated self-embedded temporal column.

Wed
29
Apr

NOON CONCERT: Flute Students of Alexandra Hawley

12:15pm | Campbell Recital Hall, MAP
Free

Program TBA.

Wed
29
Apr

Stanford Percussion Ensemble

7:30pm | Dinkelspiel Auditorium, MAP

Mark Veregge directs the Percussion Ensemble's program of works by Giuliano Kornberg, Minoru Miki, Adi Morag, Lou Harrison, John Cage, and Richard Kvistad.

Fri
01
May

NOON CONCERT: Voice Students of Nova Jiménez

12:15pm | Campbell Recital Hall, MAP
Free

Program TBA.

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