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Musicology

Eleanor Selfridge-Field

Scholar, writer, editor, and consultant on musical history, cultural history, music technology, music as intellectual property.

Special fields: music (especially opera and instrumental music; Venetian history and culture) from 1585 to 1825; computer theories of music and music representation; musical data as intellectual property.

Anna Schultz

Anna Schultz is Associate Professor of Music at Stanford University. Her first book, Singing a Hindu Nation, was published by Oxford University Press in 2013, and her second book, Songs of Translation: Bene Israel Gender and Textual Orality, is also under contract with OUP. Dr. Schultz’s research has been supported by fellowships from Fulbright-Hays, the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Association of University Women, the Hellman Foundation, the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute, the University of Illinois, and Stanford University.

Jesse Rodin

Jesse Rodin strives to make contact with lived musical experiences of the distant past. Focusing on the fifteenth century, he immerses himself in the original sources, singing from choirbooks, memorizing melodies and their texts, even recreating performances held at weddings, liturgical ceremonies, and feasts. In 2010 he and Professor Craig Sapp launched the Josquin Research Project, which uses digital tools to subject fifteenth-century repertories to both close and “distant” reading.

William Mahrt

Special fields: theory and performance of Medieval and Renaissance music, Medieval studies. Articles on Gregorian chant, Troubadours, Medieval Performance, Machaut, Dufay, Lasso, Dante, and English cathedrals.

Workshops in Gregorian chant and Renaissance polyphony.

Joint editor, Leonard Ratner Festschrift.

Woodrow Wilson Fellow, 1973; NEH-Newberry grant, 1976; Mellon Junior Faculty Grant, 1978; NEH Lecturer, 1986-87, 1989-90; Chairman, Western Culture Program, 1984-85.

Charles Kronengold

Charles Kronengold has written on twentieth-century Western art music (Elliott Carter, Morton Feldman, John Cage, Debussy, Schoenberg, Varèse), popular-music genres (funk, soul, disco, bossa nova, pop), film, and such philosophical subjects as composers’ intentions, the roles of accidents in theory, and the relevance of African American music to current debates about the “post-secular.” His recent research has concerned the ways that modern artistic genres condition, depict, embody and help to transform the activity of thinking.

Heather Hadlock

Special fields:  18th- and 19th-century French and Italian opera, feminist criticism and gender studies, and French Romanticism. Her current research encompasses operatic masculinities, opera in the digital age, and divas and technology.

Thomas Grey

Special fields: Wagner, 19th-century opera, history of musical aesthetics and criticism, Romantic music and visual culture.

Albert Cohen

Special fields: history of music theory, French music of the 17th and 18th centuries. Publications: Music in the French Royal Academy of Sciences (Princeton, 1981), Music in the Royal Society of London, 1660-1806 (Info. Coordinators, 1987); edition of J.-B. Lully’s Ballet Royal de Flore (Olms Verlag, 2001).

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