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Musicology

Gabriel Ellis

Gabriel Ellis is a musicology PhD student at Stanford University. His current research focuses on intersections between music, technology, and identity in popular (and unpopular) genres, especially art pop, indie rock, and hip-hop. Other interests include the castrati, dandyism, and music and literature. He has presented research at the Midwest Chapter Meeting of the American Musicological Association and at the Music and Visual Cultures International Conference in Maynooth, Ireland. 

Michael Kinney

Michael examines representation and identity politics in late 19th, 20th and 21st century opera and musical theatre. Specifically, his work addresses issues of vocality, technology, and aging, with a focus on diva worship, fan studies, and queerness. Other interests include discourses of “late style” throughout music history, temporality in musical theatre, and the aesthetics of trash and disgust in 20th and 21st century film sound and music. 

David Wilson

David Wilson is a musicology Ph.D. student whose research interests lie at the intersection of music and politics. His current research focuses on the ways in which the music of Cultural Revolution-era China interacted with political ideologies, discursive practices, and the construction of gender. Other research interests include the ways in which political structures of totalitarian regimes shape creative practices, as well as issues of vocality and vocalism in song and concert repertories of 19th-century Europe.

Kirstin Haag

Kirstin Haag is a doctoral student in Musicology at Stanford University. Her research interests include vocal music transmission, early polyphony, and contemporary opera production. She also has experience in the production and direction of opera and musical theater works. Prior to coming to Stanford, she received a B.A. in Music and English Literature from the University of California, Davis, and taught high school in Nashville through Teach for America.

Carol Vernallis

Special Fields: audiovisual aesthetics, digital technologies, film music, popular culture and popular music, production practice, YouTube, music video and post-classical cinema

Ioanida Costache

My current research explores issues of race and ethnicity, performance/construction of identity, cultural memory, trauma, and history as they intersect in lautareasca music, a Romani musico-oral tradition of Romania. Before coming to Stanford, I earned a B.A. in Music from Amherst College and spent a year researching and playing lautareasca music in Romania on a Fulbright. Other areas of interest include applied ethnomusicology, alternative epistemologies, critical theory and digital humanities.

Tysen Dauer

Tysen’s current work investigates the racialized aesthetics of low-level psychological states in the reception of early American minimalism. The project connects music transcription and analysis, auditory neuroscience and music cognition, ethnography, archival work, and critical race theory to make sense of first-person experiences of minimalist compositions. The work entails experimental psychology studies in collaboration with the NeuroMusic lab, the Music Engagement Research Initiative, and the Culture and Emotion lab.

Sebastián Salvadó

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (2011-2014)
Research Fellow, Norwegian Institute in Rome - University of Oslo (2014-2015)

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