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Computer-Based Music Theory and Acoustics

John Strawn

Since childhood I straddled the two worlds of engineering and audio, starting with piano lessons and learning to solder. I was a major in organ performance and music theory at Oberlin, where I also worked in the analog electronic music studio and learned Music V. I went to Berlin to study musicology on a Fulbright and learned more about synthesizers and studio technology. Then I traveled to Japan, where I performed and conducted independent research in electronic music with an IBM Watson Fellowship.

Nolan Lem

Nolan Lem is an artist and researcher whose work reflects a broad range of influences and mediums. He has premiered work at the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History (NYC), Pioneer Works Center for Art and Innovation (BK), The Wallach Gallery (NYC), Flux Fair, Riverside Park, Columbia University, Spencer Museum of Art, and the NIME (New Interfaces for Musical Expression) Conference among others. He has received commissions from the National Science Foundation (NSF), West Harlem Art Fund and the Hall Center for the Humanities.

Spencer Salazar

Spencer Salazar is a doctoral student at Stanford CCRMA. His research is focused on systems and forms for computer-based music expression, composition, and experience. Previously, he has created new software and hardware interfaces for the ChucK audio programming language, developed prototype consumer electronics for top technology companies, architected large-scale social music interactions for Smule, an iPhone application developer, and composed for laptop and mobile phone ensembles.

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